Carnivalising Pop: Music Festival Cultures: a one-day symposium at the University of Salford

Whats-on-guide-for-music-festivals-and-events-in-the-UK-in-September-2012

Come and mark the start of the festival season at our Carnivalising Pop Symposium at the UNiversity of Salford organised by George McKay and featuring Gina Arnold, Alan Lodge and other researchers in the field of music festivals, as well as researchers from the arena concerts project coordinated by Benjamin Halligan, Kirsty Fairclough-Isaacs, Nicola Spelman and Rob Edgar.

Symposium 2014
Carnivalising Pop: Music Festival Cultures: a one-day symposium at the University of Salford

Friday June 13, 2014

Guest speakers:

Dr Gina Arnold, Stanford University, USA, author of Route 666: On the Road to Nirvana, Kiss This: Punk in the Present Tense
Alan Lodge, independent photographer and festival activist, discusses some of his classic images from 1970s free festivals and 1980s/1990s free party scene.

Other contributors include:

Dr Nick Gebhardt, Birmingham City University
Dr Roxanne Yeganegy, Leeds Metropolitan University
Prof George McKay, University of Salford
Dr Anne Dvinge, University of Copenhagen
Dr Mark Goodall, Bradford University
Dr Rebekka Kill, Leeds Metropolitan University
Prof Andrew Dubber, Birmingham City University (TBC).
Tipi Circle, Glastonbury Festival 2000
Tipi Circle, Glastonbury Festival 2000

… Newport. Beaulieu. Monterey. Notting Hill. Woodstock. Glastonbury. Nimbim. Roskilde. Reading. Stonehenge. Castlemorton. Love Parade. Burning Man… Popular music festivals are one of the strikingly successful and enduring features of seasonal popular cultural consumption for young people and older generations of enthusiasts. Notwithstanding the annual declaration of the ‘death of festival’, a dramatic rise in the number of music festivals in the UK and around the world has been evident as festivals become a pivotal economic driver in the popular music industry. In 2010, there were over 700 music festivals in Britain alone, and it is estimated that three million people attend music festivals a year. Today’s festivals range from the massive to community and ‘boutique’ events.

The festival has become a key feature of the contemporary music industry’s commercial model, and one of major interest to young people as festival-goers themselves and as students. But the pop festival also has a radical past in the counterculture, a utopian strand in alternative living, some antagonistic anti-authoritarian history, an increasingly mediated other presence, as well as a strong current ethical identity. In the community/communitas of festival, interpretations vary from Temporary Autonomous Zone to festival as pollutant of the rural, from celebration to destruction of the genius loci.

Jimi Hendrix, Woodstock 1969
Jimi Hendrix, Woodstock 1969

At the start of the 2014 pop festival season, we are holding this international event. The purpose of the symposium is to discuss and explore the significance of music festival cultures. In part the event presents work in progress from the forthcoming collection The Pop Festival: History, Music, Media, Culture (McKay ed., Bloomsbury, 2015 and The Arena Concert (Halligan, Edgar, Fairclough-Isaacs, Spelman, ads Bloomsbury 2015)

But we may also have some space for other current researchers and festival organisers in the field to share their ideas too—please get in touch, soon. The day will be of interest across disciplines, from Popular Music, Media and Cultural Studies, Performance, Film, History, Sociology, American Studies, Business, Tourism and Leisure, Organisation Studies. and it will be of interest to festival organisers and festival-goers too …

Registration

This is a free event, as part of the AHRC Connected Communities Programme. It is organised by Prof George McKay, Connected Communities Leadership Fellow (g.a.mckay@salford.ac.uk).

Carnivalising Pop registration form

However advance registration is essential—to register, contact Dr Deborah Woodman, conference administrator, d.woodman@salford.ac.uk, +44 (0)161 295 5876, or download the registration form above, complete and return. Any queries to Dr Woodman.

Salford University School of Arts and Media Graduate Prog talk 7th May: Martin Hall on the Violence of Things and Hannah Arendt

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Media City UK (Salford University Campus): Room 2.07. 3pm-4pm. All welcome

The Violence of Things

Things and their images can carry complex, pre-verbal meanings that derive their valency from not being spoken. For example, the rich public archive of Buddhist iconography in Sri Lanka may, simultaneously, convey the principles of non-violence and also the trauma of recent extrajudicial killing. Similarly, the extreme violence of crucifixion is celebrated as religious art or a mark of forgiveness, but may also evoke memories of conquest and genocide. In her On Violence, published in 1969, Hannah Arendt insisted that, rather than being an extreme manifestation of power, violence has an independent instrumentality. This insight, that has remained undeveloped in subsequent work on materiality, has provocative implications for the material world of things. Understanding the ways in which the material archive is central to the instrumentality of violence leads, in turn, to appreciating the ways in which the archive interacts with the performance of public life.

Professor Martin Hall is a historical archaeologist and strategic leader. He joined the University of Salford in April 2009 as VC Designate, before taking up his role as VC on 1 August, 2009.

Born in Guildford, Professor Hall holds dual British and South African citizenship. After undertaking undergraduate and post-graduate studies in archaeology at the University of Cambridge he moved to South Africa in 1974. He was for a time President of the World Archaeological Congress and General Secretary of the South African Archaeological Society. After working at two major museums in the 1980s, he moved to UCT in 1983, where he led the Centre for African Studies and later became the Head of the Department of Archaeology. He was the inaugural Dean of Higher Education Development between 1999 and 2002 when he was able to exercise another of his interests, academic technology for innovative teaching and learning – particularly the use of digital and new media.

UNIVERSITY OF SALFORD CHALLENGING MEDIA LANDSCAPES CONFERENCE 2014

censorshipCHALLENGING MEDIA LANDSCAPES CONFERENCE 2014

Date: Monday 17-Tuesday 18 November 2014

Venue: University of Salford, MediacityUK, Salford, Manchester.

The theme of the Challenging Media Landscapes conference is Exploring Media Choice and Freedom. It is hosted and organized by the University of Salford at MediacityUK and is part of the five day 2014 International Media Festival, Salford.

 Conference Aim

The aim of the 2014 Challenging Media Landscapes conference is to undertake an exploration of a range of the main conceptual and practice based issues which have framed the academic analysis of ideas, practical expressions and critiques of freedom and choice in media environments over the course of at least the last decade.

Papers may have as their focus empirical cases, conceptual and theoretical contributions, or both. They may also report on practice based research across the range of media scholarship. Research which is of an exploratory and interdisciplinary orientation is welcome. Broadly speaking, papers are invited which address the range of actors, institutions, structures, instruments and processes in media environments that affect and challenge in some significant way our understanding of media freedom and choice.

Below is a set of five core themes, to be interpreted flexibly, around which contributions might be centred, though ideas for papers which do not sit in or across one or more of these areas, but which address the core aim of the conference, are also welcomed.

 Theme One: Freedom, Choice and Privacy in Media Environments

Debates about privacy in media environments, particularly the online world, burn as strongly as they ever have. Some even contend that we are already in a post-privacy age, with the envelopment of professional and personal interactions and relations through social media and the melding of the two spheres, manifest, for example, in forms of immaterial labour. Concerns are expressed about surveillance, the treatment of protest by the State, and abandonment of respect for privacy by commercial organisations.  Yet, high profile dissenting organisations and analysts, such as Wikileaks, IndyMedia and The Invisible Committee, for example – provide evidence of a more complex, contested environment. Wikileaks’s maxim “privacy for individuals and transparency for institutions” is suggestive of a new paradigm of what must be private, and what will be public. This theme calls for papers which explore the contemporary nature of privacy.  What imperatives arise from its protection and what challenges arise in trying to secure it?

 

Theme Two: Policy Choices and Freedom in Changing Media Environments

The Internet is eroding the boundaries between the press, broadcasting and new, on-demand media services. The re-articulation of traditional Public Service Broadcasting as Public Service Media has now arguably been well-established. The rise of social media has created a set of new online communications environments where the associated commercial and governance protocols are still very much in their infancy and thus contested. What are the different ways of considering freedom and choice in this evolving era of media convergence? What are the key challenges that are developing in converging communications  environments in terms of broadening and maintaining choice and what are the implications of this? How has this been manifest in the consideration of  issues such as market regulation and the prescription of base line public service? This theme of the conference calls for papers which evoke new thinking in areas such as: new media market environments; possible subsidisation of media content, copyright regulation, ‘net neutrality’, and the possible regulation of social media.

 

Theme Three: The Growth of Big Data and Media Freedom

Debates about freedom, choice and control have been heightened by exponential growth in the range and amount of digitally collected and stored information. This has led to claims that the application of so called “Big Data” offers unparalleled opportunities to: understand social problems; track changes in public behaviour; and to develop more precise, incisive and nuanced policy responses to the needs of people as citizens, audience members, readers and consumers. More fundamentally, Big Data has been seen as challenging what we know and how we know it. However, superficial and deterministic assumptions that Big Data can automaticially produce solutions to a range of social problems ignore key questions around the interests which gather and have access to such data; exercise control over data flows; and undertake action to analyse and interpret such data. These concerns are already important sites of analysis and contestation in academic, governmental and media circles and this theme calls for contributions which will take forward the important debates this activity has generated.

 Theme 4: Journalism, Media Freedom and Democracy

The principle of journalistic freedom centres on ideas about democracy, the Fourth Estate and the public sphere. However, the Leveson Inquiry (2012) in the UK was a potent reminder both of the limits of those freedoms and of their capacity to be abused. Globally, journalists are struggling to establish and maintain their freedom in fledgling democracies, such as the post-Arab Spring countries. The emergence of participatory (or ‘citizen’) journalism represents another important development, including a challenge to the professional status and values of journalists and to their ability to foster and regain public trust. Some argue that we are witnessing a democratisation of media through growing interactivity in journalism and apparently decentralised social media. This theme focuses on the range of possible responses to ideas about freedom in journalism in a variety of contexts in the twenty-first century. It welcomes both specific case studies of the notion of freedom in journalism and new attempts to theorise and  explain critically the evolving and often elusive nature this idea.

Theme 5: Articulations of, and Barriers to, Creativity, Freedom and Choice in Media Practices

Media practice has long been a core manifestation of  creativity, and the exercising of freedom and choice in the pursuit of excellence. However, media technologies and practices, individual and collective, commercial and non-commercial,  are constantly changing. This theme calls for contributions which explore key changes in media practice from the perspective of creativity, freedom and choice. Papers and other contributions (such as audiovisual materials) may train their focus on the gamut of media practice from screenwriting to distribution and exhibition, from performance practices to cinematographic practices, from directing to sound design, from animation to games designs. Papers which explore multi-disciplinary and converged media practices, creative forms and business models are particular welcome.

 Submission of Abstracts

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be submitted in Word document format by 9 June 2014 to:

artdes-cmlabstracts@salford.ac.uk.

Your abstract should address one of the above themes (please indicate which) and have a separate cover sheet providing your name(s), institutional affiliation(s) and e-mail address(es). You will be notified of acceptance by 15 July, 2014. Full papers are due no later than 1 November, 2013.

It is the intention of the organisers to put together an edited volume of the conference contributions.

 

Details on booking registration and accommodation options will follow on acceptance of your proposal.

 

For further enquiries, contact the conference director:

Seamus Simpson,
Professor of Media Policy,
Director of the Communication, Cultural and Media Studies Research Centre,

University of Salford,
MediaCityUK,
Salford Quays,
Salford.
Manchester M502HE

Email: s.simpson@salford.ac.uk

Sex and the City Ten Years On: Landmark Television and its Legacy

Carrie-Bradshaw-tutu
I’m very excited to be speaking on the plenary at the Sex and the City Ten Years On: Landmark Television and its Legacy event on Friday April 4 2014 | 9am–7pm (including drinks reception)at the University of Roehampton, London

Plenary Speakers: Kim Akass, Janet McCabe, Kirsty Fairclough-Isaacs,
Beatriz Oria and Professor Mandy Merck

2014 will mark ten years since the final episode of Sex and the City (HBO 1998–2004) was broadcast. During the programme’s six seasons, and throughout the decade following its finale, Sex and the City has continued to be recognised as one of the most contentious and cherished series in recent television history, having tapped into a zeitgeist consumed by postfeminism
to become a cultural touchstone. Embraced and vilified with unforgettable vehemence by audiences, critics and the media, this conference will explore the ways in which the impact of SATC and its ‘afterlife’ continues to be felt
across popular culture and in a television marketplace that is hugely indebted to the way the series rewrote the boundaries of the medium.

Early bird* rate: £40 | Full rate: £50
Student rate: £20 up until Friday 28 February 2014, £25 thereafter
*Early bird rate is available up until Friday 28 February 2014
Lunch, refreshments and a drinks reception are included in the rate

To book your place please go to
http://estore.roehampton.ac.uk/ and select “Conferences”

For further information please contact Julia Noyce,
julia.noyce@roehampton.ac.uk or 020 8392 3698.

For academic enquiries please contact
Dr. Deborah Jermyn at d.jermyn@roehampton.ac.uk

Celebrity Studies Conference Exhibition Announced

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I’m speaking at the Celebrity Studies Conference at Royal Holloway, University of London in June 2014 on Jane Fonda and “acceptable ageing” in the popular media as part of the Lasting Stars panel.

The line up is looking very exciting, with a recently announced specially curated exhibition by renowned celebrity photographer Caranthia West’s work, whose intimate portraits of the stars include Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Anjelica Huston, Carly Simon and many more.

With keynotes from Nick Couldry, Richard Dyer, Diane Negra, Mandy Merck and Sean Redmond, this conference looks set to be diverse and engaging.

Full programme to be announced here shortly…http://celebritystudiesconference.com/keynotes/

Salford Arts and Media Post-Graduate Talks: Ridiculumus’ Total Football // Voice and Joy Division

Two great talks in our Arts and Media Post-graduate Talks series:

Wednesday 27 November, 3pm, MediaCityUK / Salford Uni building; room 2.20; 3-4pm

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Internal Speaker: Dr Richard Talbot
Devising Ridiculusmus’ Total Football: a schematic reading of performance process
This talk critically reflects on a series of drawings created during the devising process for Ridiculumus’ Total Football (2012). Ridiculusmus’ production, a narrative of a non-sporty bureaucrat tasked with harnessing the enthusiasm of football fans in the interests of national cohesion, examines the impossibility of thorough incorporation of a national body within the Olympic mo(ve)ment. Based on an existing convention among football commentators for contextualizing and narrating team play, a series of photographs of sketches-in-process discussed here capture the marks of live notation as an urgent activity during devising. As such the reader has access to a snapshot from Ridiculusmus’ rehearsal methods and process. The paper analyses the notation devices employed in the sketches arguing that the approximate qualities of sketched notation, and its failed totality, capture the tone of comedy in this work about masculine hubris. While the sketches attempt to keep pace with the spontaneity of tactics devised by performers, the paper argues that performance systems and dance notation that have paid attention to architecture and spatial arrangement as a score do not generally notate intention or strategy. The paper presents the idea that the sketches document a multiplicity of tactics, and footballing metaphor in process.
External Speaker: Dr Milla Tiainen (Anglia Ruskin University)
“Ventriloquism and convulsion: Voice, aesthetics, and paradoxes of agency in Anton Corbijn’s Control
As recent returns to this topic in media and cultural theory highlight, attempts to think about the voice soon gravitate on several paradoxes. Vocal emissions performatively produce the very (self-)articulating being and bodily presence that presumably act as their source. Whilst delivering selves and bodies as part of the world, vocal expressions at the same time inevitably depart from their emitters. As projection, the voice both exposes and replaces its source. Whether in a ‘live’ situation or when engaged in cinematic/other mediatised experience, we arguably strive to attach vocal sonorities to a visible origin. Yet, to elaborate on Steven

Connor (2000) there is always something ‘ventriloqual’ in the voice’s ultimate incompatibility with such visually ensured origins. In sum, the relations of voice to agency, embodiment, space, perception, power, and technical media are expandingly complex. My intention in this talk is to explore and further conceptualise these complexities in conversation with Control(2007), the film directed by Anton Corbijn about Joy Division, particularly the band’s late lead singer and lyricist Ian Curtis. This film, I contend, harnesses some of the above-sketched paradoxes of voice through its narrative but especially audiovisual and aesthetic presentations of Curtis’s character and vocal performances. I will inspect the voice as part of Curtis’s diegetic agency, but also as an agency in its own right in excess of its emitter’s control. This takes place in relation to such other distinctive audiovisual aspects of the film’s portrayal of Curtis as the dancing, convulsing body and the (still) face in close-up. This talk aims to address three areas that intertwine in my current research: the study of the ethico-aesthetics of voice in contemporary artistic practices and media culture; the return in the analysis of media to the political potential of sensory, aesthetic arrangements to shape our feelings, experience and thought processes; and the examination of non-normative media cultural masculinities from these two perspectives.

 Milla Tiainen is Lecturer and Course Leader for Media Studies at Anglia Ruskin University. During 2013-2014, she is working as a postdoctoral researcher in the Academy of Finland funded project “Deleuzian Music Studies”. Tiainen’s current research interests include the voice in contemporary artistic practice, media culture and theory, theories of affect, rhythm and the body in movement, sound and performance studies, and new materialist approaches in cultural/media studies and feminist thought. She has published widely in the areas of music scholarship and cultural theory. Her work has recently appeared or is forthcoming in such publications as the edited volume  Carnal Knowledge: Towards a New Materialism through the Arts (IB Tauris, 2013), Body&Society, and NECSUS – European Journal of Media Studies. She is finishing a book about a new Deleuzian approach to musical performance (under contract with University of Minnesota Press).

Exploring British Film and Television Stardom Conference, Queen Mary, University of London. Nov 2nd 2013

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A little late on this one, but it looks great. Organised by Julie Lobalzo-Wright and Adrian Garvey.

Exploring British Film and Television Stardom Conference

Saturday, 2 November 2013 at Queen Mary, University of London

Supported by Living British Cinema

Keynote speakers: Dr. Melanie Bell (Newcastle University) and

Dr. Andrew Spicer (University of the West of England)

While British cinema and television history are thriving fields of scholarship,the issue of stardom has been insufficiently explored in national terms, and most British star images suggest that the dominant Hollywood model, associated with individualism, glamour, and consumption, sits uneasily in a British cultural context.

A decade after groundbreaking work by Geoffrey Macnab, in Searching for Stars: Stardom and Acting in British Cinema, and Bruce Babington’s British Stars and Stardom: From Alma Taylor to Sean Connery, there are new directions in star studies to consider, including performance, fandom and transnational stardom. Has film stardom now been usurped by celebrity, calling into question Christine Gledhill’s assertion that cinema “still provides the ultimate confirmation of stardom”? Meanwhile, television in this period has been marked by the phenomenon of a wave of British stars, including Hugh Laurie, Dominic West, Idris Elba and Damien Lewis, who have been reimagined in American long-form drama, and by the recent international success of Downton Abbey.

This one-day conference seeks to explore British stardom from historical, cultural, industrial and contemporary perspectives and will be an unprecedented opportunity to study stars in a British context. The conference aims to explore the issues around media stardom and national identity in innovative and challenging ways.  We welcome proposals from established academics, postgraduates, and independent scholars in the field.

MIRROR MIRROR CONFERENCE

mirrormirrorA fantastic event and interesting review by Rina Ross.

ageing, ageism and feature films

“The photo is never a mirror” Dr.  Margaret Morganroth Gullette

After I attended the Lumière Blanche Festival I explored with another member of the Film Group the possibilities of reaching  and exposing young people to images of old women. We obviously thought of the caring professions following Dr. Depassio’s example. But surprise! double surprise it is the London College of Fashion that set the trend.

Hannah Zeilig organised the best conference on Ageing that I have attended these last two years: Mirror Mirror: Representation and Reflections on Age and Ageing. This was not academics talking to academics. This event was about changing attitudes and Hannah explains this need in the foreword of the conference document.

The attendance was a wonderful mix of women of all ages.  I noted by talking to young women that their perceptions of old women were changing there and then.   The old woman was…

View original post 475 more words

School of Arts and Media Book Launch and Launch of the Graduate Programme 16th October 2013

School of Arts and Media Book Launch and Launch of the Graduate Programme, Wednesday 16 October, Media City room 2.36, 4pm, Salford, UK.

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Each speaker will give a short presentation on the book, how it came about and the critical issues that it raises, before opening up for a panel discussion and Q and A.
The presentations will be as follows: Kirsty Fairclough on The Music Documentary (Routledge 2013)Michael Goddard on The Cinema of Raúl Ruiz (Wallflower/Columbia UP, 2013), Benjamin Halligan onResonances (Continuum/Bloomsbury, 2013) and Tony Whyton on Beyond a Love Supreme (Oxford University Press, 2013).
Graduate Programme for School of Arts and Media, 2013/14 
Location: 2.20, MediaCityUK (unless otherwise stated)

Time: Internal speakers, 3-3.50pm; External speakers, 4.00-5.30pm.
The programme features a number of internationally renowned academics and writers, and this year we have assembled a series of talks that look to timely questions of media, power and digital activism, film, sound and voice, and creative writing and aesthetics, reflecting the diverse research make-up of the School of Arts and Media. sound and voice, and creative writing and aesthetics, reflecting the diverse research make-up of the School of Arts and Media.
Wednesday the 30th of October, Working Class Movement Library
Radical Studies Network Event
Chris Witter (Lancaster University), “Remapping Social Relations in the New American Short Fiction of the 1960s.”
Stephen Dippnall (University of Salford), “Hating America? The British Left and the Execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg.”
Jen Morgan (University of Salford), “ ‘Occupy This Wide and Fruitful Plain’: Chartist Fiction as Response to Middle-Class Social Problem Novels.”
Note: this event takes place from 3 to 5 in the Working Class Movement Library
Wednesday the 13th of November, Media City room 2.19 3 to 5PM
Saudi Media Research PGR forum.
Emerging out of the strong presence of Saudi Arabian PGR researchers within our school, this forum will present the research work of some of them namely Mohammad Mesawa, Saeed Alamoudy and Abdullah Abalkhail (more speakers TBC). Examining such issues as the rebranding of Makkah as a creative city, online activism and the Arab Spring, this promises to be a lively forum of interest to the School’s PGR and research community as a whole.
Wednesday 27th of November
Dr Milla Tiainen (Anglia Ruskin University)
“Ventriloquism and convulsion: Voice, aesthetics, and paradoxes of agency in Anton Corbijn’s Control
As recent returns to this topic in media and cultural theory highlight, attempts to think about the voice soon gravitate on several paradoxes. Vocal emissions performatively produce the very (self-)articulating being and bodily presence that presumably act as their source. Whilst delivering selves and bodies as part of the world, vocal expressions at the same time inevitably depart from their emitters. As projection, the voice both exposes and replaces its source. Whether in a ‘live’ situation or when engaged in cinematic/other mediatised experience, we arguably strive to attach vocal sonorities to a visible origin. Yet, to elaborate on Steven Connor (2000) there is always something ‘ventriloqual’ in the voice’s ultimate incompatibility with such visually ensured origins. In sum, the relations of voice to agency, embodiment, space, perception, power, and technical media are expandingly complex. My intention in this talk is to explore and further conceptualise these complexities in conversation with Control (2007), the film directed by Anton Corbijn about Joy Division, particularly the band’s late lead singer and lyricist Ian Curtis. This film, I contend, harnesses some of the above-sketched paradoxes of voice through its narrative but especially audiovisual and aesthetic presentations of Curtis’s character and vocal performances. I will inspect the voice as part of Curtis’s diegetic agency, but also as an agency in its own right in excess of its emitter’s control. This takes place in relation to such other distinctive audiovisual aspects of the film’s portrayal of Curtis as the dancing, convulsing body and the (still) face in close-up. This talk aims to address three areas that intertwine in my current research: the study of the ethico-aesthetics of voice in contemporary artistic practices and media culture; the return in the analysis of media to the political potential of sensory, aesthetic arrangements to shape our feelings, experience and thought processes; and the examination of non-normative media cultural masculinities from these two perspectives.
 Milla Tiainen is Lecturer and Course Leader for Media Studies at Anglia Ruskin University. During 2013-2014, she is working as a postdoctoral researcher in the Academy of Finland funded project “Deleuzian Music Studies”. Tiainen’s current research interests include the voice in contemporary artistic practice, media culture and theory, theories of affect, rhythm and the body in movement, sound and performance studies, and new materialist approaches in cultural/media studies and feminist thought. She has published widely in the areas of music scholarship and cultural theory. Her work has recently appeared or is forthcoming in such publications as the edited volume  Carnal Knowledge: Towards a New Materialism through the Arts (IB Tauris, 2013), Body&Society, and NECSUS – European Journal of Media Studies. She is finishing a book about a new Deleuzian approach to musical performance (under contract with University of Minnesota Press).
Thursday 5th of December, Media City room 2.20
Internal Speaker: Mik Pienazek (Design)
Three Themes of Impactful Research in Design
This presentation will present a number of successful research projects in the field of design:
1.                  SME Innovation strategies: with reference to graduate business start ups
2.                  Co-design as a strategy for advocacy, representation and inclusion of marginalised groups
3.                  Future ‘assisted living’ scenarios: with reference to the applications of ambient technology
Each of the research themes have been driven by a rigorous process and disparate methodologies. In addition, the 3 themes have achieved quantifiable impact relative to user groups, enterprises and curriculum.
External Speaker: Benjamin Noys (University of Chichester)
Avant-gardes have only one time”: The Situationist International, Communisation, and Aesthetics
In this intervention I wish to probe the relationship between the Situationist International (SI) and ‘communisation’ through the question of aesthetics. I take up Roland Simon’s critical reflections on the SI and what he identifies as the central contradiction of their project: between the affirmation of workers’ identity (such as in worker’s councils) as the condition of revolution, and the negation or abolition of that identity as the true revolutionary moment. He argues that this tension is also reflected in the ‘aesthetics’ of the SI, as the tension between the realisation of art, which sees artistic practice as a possible critical mode under capitalism, and the suppression of art, in which ‘art’ can only occur ‘in’ the revolution. For Simon the SI indicates the outer limit of affirmative ‘programmatism’, and presages the abandonment of any ‘positive’ identity of the proletariat in communisation. The irony I want to consider is that it is precisely the ‘side’ of the SI – affirmative, artistic, humanist and vitalist – that should have been rendered passé that is the one that has most persisted in contemporary discussion and valorisation of the SI’s legacy (from Greil Marcus to MacKenzie Wark). While Debord recognised the necessary finitude of the avant-garde aesthetic model, it seems that it is this model that we are called to affirm when discussing the SI. I want to consider if it is possible to truly suppress art in relation to the SI.
Benjamin Noys (Bsc, MA, Dphil) is Reader in English at the University of Chichester, and the author of Georges Bataille: A Critical Introduction (Pluto 2000), The Culture of Death (Berg 2005), The Persistence of the Negative: A Critique of Contemporary Theory (Edinburgh University Press 2010), and editor of Communization and its Discontents (Minor Compositions 2011). Benjamin has published widely in contemporary theory, aesthetics, psychoanalysis, film, literature and cultural politics. He is on the editorial boards of Film-Philosophy, S: Journal of the Jan Van Eyck Circle for Lacanian Ideology Critique, and Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies, and is also a corresponding editor of Historical Materialism. He directs the interdisciplinary Theory Research Group at the University of Chichester (http://theoryresearchgroup.blogspot.com/).
Wednesday 11th of December, Media City 2.20
Professor Jonathon Green (Independent researcher)
(title TBC)
I am a lexicographer, that is a dictionary maker, specialising in slang, about which I have been compiling dictionaries, writing and broadcasting since 1984.  I have also written a history of lexicography. After working on my university newspaper I joined the London ‘underground press’ in 1969, working for most of the then available titles, such as Friends, IT and Oz. I have been publishing books since the mid-1970s, spending the next decade putting together a number of dictionaries of quotations, before I moved into what remains my primary interest, slang. I have also published three oral histories: one on the hippie Sixties, one on first generation immigrants to the UK and one on the sexual revolution and its development.  Among other non-slang titles have been three dictionaries of occupational jargon, a narrative history of the Sixties, a book on cannabis, and an encyclopedia of censorship. As a freelancer I have broadcast regularly on the radio, made appearances on TV, including a 30-minute study of slang in 1996, and and written columns both for academic journals and for the Erotic Review.
Wednesday the 29th of January
Dr Emma Rees (university of Chester)
Vulvanomics: How We Talk About Vaginas.
In Vulvanomics, Emma considers why British and US culture has such a problem when talking about the female body; she maps the long history of advertising that profits from the taboo of the vagina, and she reflects on how writers, artists and filmmakers have been influenced by, or even perpetuate, this ‘shame’.
Dr Emma L. E. Rees is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Chester. Her research and teaching interests include Shakespeare studies; early modern literature and culture; film theory; and gender studies. Her new book is The Vagina: A Literary and Cultural History. Her first book wasMargaret Cavendish: Gender, Genre, Exile, and she has many other publications on Cavendish, and on gender and representation. She has also co-authored an essay on Led Zeppelin, and has published on The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.
Wednesday 12th of February
Internal Speaker: Dr Scott Thurston
Language and Motion: Postmodern Poetry and Dance
Poets have been fascinated by dance for centuries, seeing in its expressive, yet elusive, gestures an analogue for their own handling of language. In the twentieth century, this fascination led to a series of encounters between poets and dancers, such as those which took place in the multi-disciplinary milieu of the Judson Dance Theater in New York City (1962-66). Judson, however, is only part of a larger story of how poets and dancers on both sides of the Atlantic in the postmodern period sought ways to bring their respective art forms into dialogue with each other in order to create new and exciting works of the imagination. My current research hopes to shed light on how we relate to, and seek to express, our embodied self in language and movement, and will explore how the tension between the constraints on our being and the possibilities for overcoming these constraints becomes the subject of groundbreaking artistic endeavour.
External Speaker: Professor Des Freedman (Goldsmiths College, London)
Reflections on Media Power
Media power is a crucial, although often taken for granted, concept. Does it express the economic and political prowess of particular ‘media moguls’? Does it refer to the media’s capacity to modify attitudes and beliefs, transform social circumstances and exert influence over other social institutions? Does it refer to the ability of media to provide other state or corporate actors with a valuable resource to assert their own dominance? Does it point to a concentration of symbolic influence that is mobilized in quite personalized contexts or to the growth of economic blocs that are all the more significant in 21stcentury ‘knowledge’ and ‘information societies’? Are we to believe that the media are increasingly the locus of power or, as Castells argues, that ‘the media are not the holders of power, but they constitute by and large the space where power is decided’? As a way into thinking through some of these issues, the paper identifies four paradigms of media power. As with any conceptual model, it is filled with holes and probably fails to address all the complexities of media power. However, in thinking through different frames through which to assess the dynamics of media power, it may be a useful starting point.
Des Freedman is a professor of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of The Politics of Media Policy, co-author (with James Curran and Natalie Fenton) ofMisunderstanding the Internet and co-editor (with Daya Thussu) of Media and Terrorism: Global Perspectives. He is the chair of the Media Reform Coalition and is working on his new book, The Contradictions of Media Power.
Wednesday 26th of February
Allen Fisher (Emeritus Professor, MMU)
Articulating a Research Practice.
A personal summary of the tactics, plans and methods used in my poetics and artistic practice, in the facture of poetry and visual imagery. The talk will discuss some of the conceptual and pragmatic ideas involved and will include examples.
Allen Fisher is a poet, painter, publisher, editor and art-historian and has produced over one hundred and twenty chapbooks and books of poetry, graphics and art documentation. A major figure in British Linguistically Innovative Poetry, he worked for over thirty years on two massive projects in multiple books,Place (now published in a complete edition from Reality Street, 2005) and Gravity as a consequence of shape, now collected across three volumes: Gravity (Salt, 2004), Entanglement (The Gig, 2004) and Leans(Salt, 2008). He has intensely engaged with the history of ideas, science, art and architecture.
Wednesday the 12th of March
Double external session on Digital/Social Media and Activism
Dr Paolo Gerbaudo (King’s College, London)
Social Media Activism and the Generic Internet User, between Homogenisation and Disintermediation
Paolo Gerbaudo is Lecturer in Digital Culture and Society at King’s College London. Previously he had been an Associate Lecturer in Journalism and Communication, at the Media Department at Middlesex University, and an Adjunct Professor of Sociology at the American University in Cairo (AUC). Apart from his academic work Paolo has also acted as a journalist covering social movements, political affairs and environmental issues, and as a new media artist exhibiting at art festivals and shows. He holds a PhD in Media and Communications from Goldsmiths College.
Dr Fidele Vlado (King’s College London)
Online Activism and Electronic Civil Disobedience
Fidele Vlavo joined the Department of CMCI in January 2012. She was previously lecturing at the department of arts and media at London South Bank University where she completed her doctoral research. Fidele holds a BA (Hons) in Arts Management (London South Bank University) and a degree in Film studies (Sorbonne-Nouvelle Paris). Her PhD examined the concept of electronic civil disobedience and the practice of online activism. It provided a discursive analysis of the use of cyberspace as an exclusive site for political protest. Prior to her PhD, Fidele worked on digital projects at the Courtauld Institute and the British Museum.
Wednesday the 26th of March
Internal Speaker: Professor Seamus Simpson (University of Salford; English and Journalism directorate and head of CCM)
Public Service Journalism and Converging Media Systems
Concepts and practices of public service have been an integral part of the evolution of communication media systems for decades in Europe and beyond. However, the process of media convergence has called forth an examination of the place of public service in communications. Ideas of public service have been an important part of the development of journalism and have too come under increasing pressure in the era of media convergence. This session will commence with an exploration of some of the key ideas that have shaped articulations of public service in media systems and journalism. It will then go on to explore some of the challenges and opportunities for public service journalism which have arisen from the development convergent media platforms and services. It will conclude by exploring the extent to which public service journalism is relevant today in our diverse-yet-converging, highly commercialised, digital multi-media systems.
External Speaker: Professor James Curran (Goldsmiths College, London)
Mickey Mouse Squeaks Back
What are the main grounds for dismissing media and cultural studies as a ‘Mickey Mouse’ subject? What underlies these attacks? Are they justified in full or in part? A media studies academic surveys the field, and responds to its critics.
James Curran is Director of the Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre and Professor of Communications. While at Goldsmiths, he has held a number of visiting appointments including McClatchy Professor (Stanford), Annenberg Professor (UPenn), Bonnier Professor (Stockholm University) and NRC Professor (Oslo University). He has written or edited 22 books about the media, some in collaboration with others. These include Media and Democracy, Routledge, 2011, Power Without Responsibility (with Jean Seaton), 7th edition, Routledge, (2010), Media and Society, 5th edition, Bloomsbury, 2010 and Media and Power, Routledge, 2002 (translated into five languages). His latest book is Misunderstanding the Internet(with Natalie Fenton and Des Freedman), Routledge, 2012, arising from Leverhulme funded research. His work falls mainly into two linked areas: media history and media political economy. In media history, he has sought increasingly to relate the development of the media to wider changes in society, while in media political economy he has turned to comparative media research, drawing on quantitative methods.  This has resulted in three comparative studies, two funded by the ESRC (for outputs see ‘publications’ above). More recently still, he has been evaluating the impact of the internet and new communications technology.
Wednesday 9 April
Internal Speaker: Michael Goddard (University of Salford, Media and Broadcast directorate)
Media Ecological Approaches to Alternative and Radical Media
This presentation will explore some of the issues in approaching alternative and radical media drawing on and extending the work of Downing et al (2000) on Radical Media and Atton on Alternative Media and An Alternative Internet (2001, 2004). In particular it will use the concept of media ecologies as developed by Matthew Fuller (Fuller 2005), as a way of approaching a range of case studies drawn from both analogue and digital media. Using examples ranging from free and pirate radio and guerrilla television to cyber-activism, this talk will look at how media ecologies and approaches to self organisation can shed light on both small scale media and activist use of larger media forms (television, social media etc).
External Speaker: Dr Joss Hands (Anglia Ruskin University)
Collective Idiocy: Of Digital Multitudes and Mobs
One of the most revisited concepts in critical and media theory is that of ‘general intellect’, as originally outlined by Karl Marx in his celebrated ‘Fragment on Machines’. The concept is often framed as containing a liberatory promise via the destruction of the value of labour power, and thus the capacity of capital to generate surplus value. While autonomist theories have speculated that this concept pre-empts characteristics of the digital revolution and the creation of cooperative common, there is a potential dark side of a digitally enhanced general intellect. The paper will ask whether such intelligence is indeed ‘intelligent’. This paper explores the question of whether this is actually closer to a general ‘idiocy.’ It will explore the idiotic tendencies embodied in such thinkers as Clay Shirky, James Surowiecki and Charles Leadbeater and the likely decomposition of the common into what Heidegger refers to as the ‘they’. The paper will ask whether such collective idiocy is part of our technical condition and what, to use a pointed phrase, is to be done?
Joss Hands teaches Communication and Media Studies at Anglia Ruskin University Cambridge, where he is also director of the Anglia Research Centre in Media and Culture. He is author of @ is for Activism: Dissent Resistance and Rebellion in a Digital Culture published by Pluto Press.
Wednesday the 7th of May
Dr Susan Smith (University of Sunderland)
From Child to Adult Star: an exploration by video essay of the film career of Elizabeth Taylor
The death of Elizabeth Taylor on 23rd March 2011 prompted a global outpouring of tributes to the actress right across the various sectors of the media, some of which highlighted the need for a reappraisal of her achievements as an actress. This video essay will offer my own reflection on Taylor’s distinctiveness as a film performer, the significance of her early career and the contribution of both to her enduring stardom. In doing so, it will draw upon my AHRC funded research project on the actress’s work in film, exploring the crucial role played by Taylor’s star-defining performance in National Velvet (1944); her later collaborations with actors such as Montgomery Clift and Richard Burton; and the dynamic ways in which she made use of her eyes, voice and body in her performances. I also hope to open up for consideration the role that the video essay can play in the detailed analysis of performance and some of the challenges and benefits arising from scholarly engagement with this form.
Susan Smith is Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at the University of Sunderland, UK. Her most recent book – Elizabeth Taylor – was released in summer 2012 as part of the launch of the new Film Stars series that she co-edits for the BFI (published by Palgrave Macmillan). She is also author of Voices in Film (in Close-Up 02, 2007), The Musical: Race, Gender and Performance (2005) and Hitchcock: Suspense, Humour and Tone (2000).
Wednesday the 21st of May
Internal Speaker: Professor George McKay
Popular Music and Disability
External Speaker
Dr Liz Greene
Music and Montage in Punk Films
Liz Greene is a sound practitioner and academic whose main research interests are in the theory, history and practice of film sound. I teach film and television studies in the School of Cultures and Creative Arts at the University of Glasgow. She teaches and writes about film sound design and specialises in sound effects, the voice and sound archiving. Liz also creates sound art, music, and radio shows. She is currently creating the sound design for a documentary film on women’s experience of Long Kesh/The Maze prison during the Troubles in Northern Ireland.
Wednesday the 4th of June Mark Cote (Kings College, London)
Data Motility: Life, Labour and Debt in the Age of Big Social Data
Mark Coté is a Lecturer in Digital Culture and Society at King’s College, London. He has published extensively on Social Media, Digital media culture, Media theory, Autonomist Marxism, and Foucault. He is further exploring the relationship between the human and technology by developing the mobile phone as a research tool to examine the changing parameters of mobility, location, and information.
Wednesday the 18th of June
Internal Speaker: Dr Benjamin Halligan (Performance Directorate)
Title TBC
External Speaker: Dr Gavin Hopps (University of St Andrews)
Too Much Heaven: The Kitsch Epiphany
A talk based on Gavin Hopps current research into popular culture and radical wonder
Gavin Hopps is Lecturer in Literature & Theology and Director of the Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts at the University of St Andrews. He has been a Lecturer in English at the universities of Aachen, Oxford and Canterbury Christ Church and a Visiting Fellow at the University of Cambridge. He has published numerous articles on Romantic writing, a collection of essays on spectrality in Byron, and a monograph on the singer-songwriter Morrissey. He is currently working with Jane Stabler on a new edition of the complete poetical works of Lord Byron (to be published by Longman in 6 volumes), a monograph on popular music and radical wonder, entitled The Kitsch Epiphany, and another on the levity of Byron’s Don Juan.

Women in Comedy Arts Festival 1st- 27th October – Greater Manchester

 

 

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The first ever UK Women in Comedy Festival is being held across Greater Manchester from Tuesday October 1st until Sunday 27th 2013. The festival is a cross-collaboration between the growing number of women’s comedy producers, performers and supporters, spearheaded by Hazel O’Keefe founder of Laughing Cows Comedy. Celebrating all things funny and female across a variety of platforms including live comedy performances, comedy theatre, spoken word, book readings, film, visual art, installations, improvisation, photography, workshops and debates.
With a strong statement and a mixture of promotional, developmental and showcasing events, the Women in Comedy Arts Festival will be an opportunity for female comics across the UK to meet, perform, debate, discuss and get feedback from industry, insiders and professionals. Aiming to put an end to circular conversations and blow certain myths out of the water whilst showcasing, promoting and nurturing female comedy across a variety of platforms.

 

Find out more here…http://www.womenincomedy.co.uk/2013/home.html